Get Your College Degree in Geoengineering Here

For all those who insist the GE is not real and only “contrails”, please show them this article.

About Us

The Oxford Geoengineering Programme was founded in 2010 as an initiative of the Oxford Martin School at the University of Oxford.

Geoengineering – the deliberate large-scale intervention in the Earth’s natural systems to counteract climate change – is a contentious subject and rightly so.

The Oxford Geoengineering Programme seeks to engage with society about the issues associated with geoengineering and conduct research into some of the proposed techniques. The programme does not advocate implementing geoengineering, but it does advocate conducting research into the social, ethical and technical aspects of geoengineering. This research must be conducted in a transparent and socially informed manner.

The University of Oxford is involved in three major projects on geoengineering funded by the UK Research Councils.

They are: The Integrated Assessment of Geoengineering Proposals (IAGP) in partnership with The University of Leeds, Cardiff University, Lancaster University, University of Bristol, University of East Anglia, The Tyndall Centre and the UK Met Office; Stratospheric Particle Injection for Climate Engineering (SPICE) in partnership with The University of Bristol and Cambridge University; and Climate Geoengineering Governance (CGG), a recently announced Oxford-led project in partnership with The University of Sussex and University College London which will examine the governance and ethics of geoengineering.

GeoEngineering Graduate Programs

GeoEngineering is also known as environmental engineering; it refers to the process of intervening in the earth’s climate system for the purpose of mitigating climate change. It encompasses two primary practices: carbon dioxide removal andsolar radiation management.

GeoEngineering is a relatively new field. Graduate programs that may involve geoengineering include ocean technology, civil and environmental engineering, geological engineering, aerospace engineering, hydrology and GPS technology. Both campus based and online GeoEngineering graduate schools exist.

GeoEngineering Graduate Programs and Curriculum

Interested students can explore geoengineering in the context of disciplines ranging from environmental engineering to ocean technology. Students pursuing graduate degrees in these areas may take classes ranging from earthquake engineering to dynamics of ocean structures.


U.C. Berkley

The U.C. Berkley campus offers degrees in Geo and Environmental Engineering for the climate as well:

Energy, Civil Infrastructure and Climate

The objective of the Energy, Civil Infrastructure and Climate (ECIC) program is to educate a cadre of professionals who will be able to analyze from engineering, environmental, economic, and management perspectives complex problems such as energy efficiency of buildings, environmentally informed design of transportation systems, embodied energy of construction materials, electricity from renewable sources, and biofuels, and address such overarching societal problems as mitigation of greenhouse gas emissions and adaptation of infrastructure to a changing climate. The ECIC program also promotes research at the intersection of energy, infrastructure and climate science

— Energy, climate, and infrastructure systems are closely tied together, and these connections manifest in many forms. Our society cannot function without energy and infrastructure systems. Energy systems with the lowest possible greenhouse gas footprint are a key to mitigating climate change. Civil infrastructure systems are a backbone of society, and they are also major users of energy that needs to be reduced for a more sustainable development.


Environmental Engineering

Management of environmental resources to protect human health and the systems that support life is one biggest challenges facing modern society. In recognition of the interdisciplinary nature of these challenges, UC Berkeley’s Environmental Engineering Program provides students with training needed to address current and future environmental issues.


Geoengineering is an interdisciplinary program that offers excellent opportunities for students with background in Engineering and Earth Sciences who are interested in all aspects of soil and rock mass characterization, development of advanced simulation techniques, performance of earth structures and underground space, and identification and mitigation of natural hazards.


Columbia University

Switching over to Columbia University:

…Master of science in Earth resources engineering (M.S.-E.R.E.) graduates are specially qualified to work for engineering, financial, and operating companies engaged in mineral processing ventures, the environmental industry, environmental groups of in all industries, and for city, state, and federal agencies responsible for the environment and energy/resource conservation. At the present time, the U.S. environmental industry comprises nearly 30,000 big and small businesses with total revenues over $150 billion. Sustainable development and environmental quality has become a top priority of industry and government in the U.S. and many other nations.

Water Resources and Climate Risks

Water Resources and Climate Risks focuses on the movement, availability, and quality of water throughout the Earth, on scales ranging from individual rivers and watersheds to the entire globe. Providing this valuable resource for society is the overarching goal, and the risks posed by climate variability, extremes, and change is an important and inherent part of all research projects. Specific projects range from the management of available supplies to forecasting future availability to underlying scientific mechanisms, and span a number of disciplines such as hydrology, hydroclimatology, water resources engineering, atmospheric dynamics, and land-atmosphere interaction

A complementary degree (master of arts in climate and society) is available through Columbia University for students who are more directly interested in social or planning aspects of climate impacts, and are not quantitatively oriented.


University Of Texas, Austin

So who monitors all of this Geo-Engineering currently taking place? After all, someone needs to keep track of the changes in the Earth’s atmosphere from all that Geo-Engineering spraying. Well, first you need to go to college to learn all of this kind of stuff:

The Center for Integrated Earth System Science (CIESS) is a cooperative effort between the Jackson School of Geosciences and the Cockrell School of Engineering. The center fosters collaborative study of Earth as a coupled system with focus on land, atmosphere, water, environment, and society.

The center integrates the university’s strengths in earth system modeling, observing and monitoring, computational science and engineering, supercomputing, air resources engineering, hydrology and water resources, sedimentology and depositional processes, energy/policy, outreach/communications, and other fields.

The Center for Integrated Earth System Science (CIESS) seeks a deeper understanding of the physical chemical, biological and human interactions that determine the past, present and future states of Earth.

CIESS places a strong emphasis on the societal impacts of research in earth system science and provides a fundamental basis for understanding the world in which we live and seek sustainability.

CIESS views Earth in a holistic way, linking the atmosphere, ocean, biosphere, cryosphere, and solid earth as a coupled system. CIESS uses powerful methodologies such as satellite remote sensing and supercomputing simulations which are now profoundly changing research in earth system science.

Specifically, the goal of CIESS is to answer a wide variety of earth science questions including:

  • How do Earth’s atmosphere, ocean, biosphere, cryosphere, and lithosphere interact on all time and space scales?
  • How can we use in situ measurements, global satellite observations, proxy data, and computational analysis to describe and understand Earth’s dynamic system?
  • What has been the impact of human activity on Earth?
  • What is the future of our environment under climate change, land use change, and water use change?
  • How accurate are climate system models in providing seamless predictions at daily, seasonal, decadal or centennial timescales? Can we improve these predictions?
  • How can we reduce modeling uncertainties and make reliable predictions of extreme events at regional scales? How can we make rational decisions under uncertainties in order to mitigate, prevent, plan for or adapt to the negative potential impacts of global change? How can we apply the lessons learned from climate system models to other earth sciences and engineering?


Harvard University:
Center For The Environment

Yes, even the most prestigious of schools are in on the game.


Solar geoengineering is the concept of deliberately cooling the Earth by reflecting a small amount of inbound sunlight back into space. It is the only currently known method for reducing temperatures in the short term (years to decades), and therefore has the potential to reduce many of the worst impacts of global warming. But what would be the side effects, both physical and socio-political? How would it work and who gets to decide if it is deployed? Does humanity have the wisdom and the institutions to govern the development of such a powerful technology in this messy, multi-polar world?

This seminar series, held jointly by the Harvard University Center for the Environment (HUCE) and MIT’s Joint Program on the Science and Policy of Global Change, will explore the science, technology, governance and ethics of solar geoengineering. In bringing together international experts, participants will learn some of the greatest challenges and hear opinions on how this technology could and should be managed.

A recent seminar just took place, for example, explaining the already conducted Geo-Engineering of our planet (click on link):

Wednesday, April 30
“Eastern Pacific Emitted Aerosol Cloud Experiment: Recent Findings and New Directions”
Lynn Russell, Professor of Atmospheric Chemistry, Scripps Institution of Oceanography
MIT, Building 35-225, 127 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge

And here Harvard states that a number of experiments have already been funded:


There is a growing number of publicly funded geoengineering research programs around the world and this document is the first attempt to draw together the basic information on all of them in one place. It will update as new information becomes available.  If it is missing any program information or there are any errors please contact or

Link to Harvard document keeping track of Geo-Engineering projects around the world:

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